Name  Facial Palsy
Related to/Also known as 

Facial paralysis

Bell's Palsy
Stroke
Symptoms of Facial Palsy

"The term facial palsy generally refers to weakness of the facial muscles, mainly resulting from temporary or permanent damage to the facial nerve.

"When a facial nerve is either non-functioning or missing, the muscles in the face do not receive the necessary signals in order to function properly. This results in paralysis of the affected part of the face, which can affect movement of the eye(s) and/or the mouth, as well as other areas."

Source: Facial Palsy UK

Useful national contacts Facial Palsy UK
Link opens in new window www.facialpalsy.org.uk
Tel. 0300 030 9333

General enquiries: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.Support: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Find your local support group: Link opens in new window www.facialpalsy.org.uk/support/local-groups
• The Cheshire & Mersey group meets at The Brain Charity

Changing Faces: supports people who have any condition that affects their appearance
Link opens in new window www.changingfaces.org.uk
Tel. 0300 012 0275
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Children & young people Children with facial palsy (Facial Palsy UK)
Link opens in new window www.facialpalsy.org.uk/support/families-friends
Online resources

Facial Paralysis (MedlinePlus)
Link opens in new windowhttps://tinyurl.com/y96xfcmr

Facial nerve palsy (University Hospital Southampton NHS Trust, PDF file)
Link opens in new window https://tinyurl.com/y7s7n88a

Facial palsy (Queen Victoria Hospital NHS Foundation Trust)
Link opens in new window https://tinyurl.com/yd73lvks

Our resources

The library at the Brain Charity has a range of resources on Facial Palsy and on a wide range of disability related issues.

Name Fibromyalgia
Related to/Also known as Myofascial pain syndrome
Symptoms of Fibromyalgia
Fibromyalgia means "pain coming from the muscles and fibrous tissues" (such as tendons and ligaments), and the condition is characterised by muscle aches and pains. Other symptoms often include fatigue, sleep disturbance and headache.
Types  
Useful national contacts

Fibro Action UK (FMA UK)
Link opens in new window www.fmauk.org


UK Fibromyalgia
Tel. 01202 259155
Link opens in new window www.ukfibromyalgia.com
find your local support group:
Link opens in new window https://tinyurl.com/yany82ot
Children & young people Fibromyalgia in Children and Teens (WebMD)
Link opens in new window https://tinyurl.com/y37na7e9
Online resources NHS Choices: Fibromyalgia
Link opens in new window https://tinyurl.com/ya6jsvm7

NHS Choices video: Fibromyalgia: Suzanne's Story
Link opens in new window www.nhs.uk/video/pages/fibromyalgia.aspx
Cochrane Evidence: Acupuncture for fibromyalgia
Link opens in new window https://tinyurl.com/ycl95eff
Cochrane Evidence: Exercise for fibromyalgia
Link opens in new window https://tinyurl.com/y9oo52ed

"Exercise 'beneficial' for easing fibromyalgia-related fatigue" (Arthritis Research UK)
Link opens in new window https://tinyurl.com/yanwt24n

Fibromyalgia Forum (The Fibromyalgia Magazine)
Link opens in new window http://bit.ly/1fOjBNg
Centers for Disease Control (U.S.): Fibromyalgia
Link opens in new window https://tinyurl.com/2br7hjl
Our resources

Living with fibromyalgiaThe library at The Brain Charity has a range of resources on Fibromyalgia and on a wide range of disability-related issues.

Visit our library to read Living with Fibromyalgia by Christine Craggs-Hinton. Or have a Link opens in new window look in your local library for this book.
Find this in a library at WorldCat.org

Name Fragile X Syndrome
Related to/Also known as  see also Autism
Symptoms of Fragile X Syndrome

"Fragile X is a genetic condition that affects both boys and girls, although boys are often more severely affected.

"It can cause a range of issues with language, emotions, attention, behaviour and social interaction.

."Fragile X is the most common inherited cause of learning disability.

"Of the people who have Fragile X, nearly all boys will have a learning disability but only a third of girls. The learning disability could be mild, moderate or severe, which will affect the amount of support the person needs day-to-day."

Source: Mencap
Link opens in new window https://tinyurl.com/y4ysnrm8

Types  
Useful national contacts The Fragile X Society
Tel: 01371 875 100
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Website: Link opens in new window www.fragilex.org.uk
Mencap
Helpline 0808 808 1111
Link opens in new window www.mencap.org.uk
Children & young people An Easy Read Guide to Fragile X Syndrome for Parents (Fragile X Society)
Link opens in new window https://tinyurl.com/yy9ktgp5
News and events  
Online resources

Fragile X syndrome (Contact a Family)
Link opens in new window https://tinyurl.com/yb8sdk6
Fragile X syndrome (Mencap)
Link opens in new window https://tinyurl.com/ybcy67e8

Our resources

Understanding Fragile X Syndrome The library at The Brain Charity has a range of resources on Fibromyalgia and on a wide range of disability-related issues.

Visit our library to read Understanding Fragile X Syndrome: A Guide for Families and Professionals by Isabel Fernández Carvajal. Or have a Link opens in new window look in your local library for this book.
Find this in a library at WorldCat.org

Name Fronto-temporal Dementia (FTD)
Related to/Also known as includes:
Behavioural Variant Frontotemporal Dementia (including Pick's Disease)
Primary Progressive Aphasia
Alcohol-Related Dementias
Symptoms of Fronto-temporal Dementia

Fronto-temporal dementias include Pick's Disease. These dementias commonly affect people of working age.

The disease is difficult to diagnose because the sufferer is younger than expected, and displays different symptoms. Diagnosis takes up to three years.

Types  
Useful national contacts Frontotemporal Dementia Support Group
Telephone:  Jill Walton 07592 540555
Website: Link opens in new window www.ftdsg.org
Children & young people 

Explaining dementia to children and young people (Alzheimer's Society)
Link opens in new window https://tinyurl.com/y4bcceg4

Resources for Children and Young People (Dementia UK)
Link opens in new window www.dementiauk.org/children-and-young-people

News and events  
Online resources

Frontotemporal dementia - Diagnosis (NHS Choices)
Link opens in new window https://tinyurl.com/yd4sa8fd

Alcohol-Related Brain Damage (Alcohol Concern)
Link opens in new window www.alcoholconcern.org.uk/arbd

Our resources What If It's Not Alzheimer's?: A caregiver's guide to dementia

The library at The Brain Charity has a range of resources on Fronto-temporarl Dementia and on a wide range of disability-related issues.

Visit our library to read our copy of the book What if it's not Alzheimer's? : a caregiver's guide to dementia by Gary Radin and Lisa Radin. Or have a Link opens in new window look in your local library for this book.
Find this in a library at WorldCat.org

 

Name Functional Neurological Disorder (F.N.D.)
Related to/Also known as Functional Movement Disorders
Symptoms of Functional Neurological Disorder

"Approximately one-sixth of all patients seen by the neurology service will receive a diagnosis of functional neurological symptoms. This condition is also called 'medically unexplained neurological symptoms'.

"This common condition covers a range of symptoms but most often people experience changes in their ability to move and feel their limbs. People may experience difficulty with walking, balance, problems controlling and moving arms and legs, and experience odd or unpleasant sensations in the body like tingling or pain. Symptoms may fluctuate or be there most of the time causing a lot of distress.

"A good way to help understand functional neurological symptoms is to consider what happens when a computer breaks down. When a computer breaks down, it is usually due to a problem in the software (the programme that makes the computer work) and not the hardware (the computer chips and wires). Similarly, you can think of functional neurological symptoms as a problem where the hardware of your body (brain, spine and nerves) is not damaged, but the software of your body is not working as well as it should."

Source: Link opens in new window NHS Greater Glagow and Clyde

Types Includes NEAD (Non-Epileptic Attack Disorder)
Useful national contacts

FND Action
registered charity
c/o Involve Kent, 39-48 Marsham Street
Maidstone, Kent ME14 1HH
Link opens in new window www.fndaction.org.uk
email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Find your local support group: Link opens in new window www.fndaction.org.uk/useful-links/#


FND Hope UK
registered charity, part of international FND Hope
21 Chetwode, Banbury, Oxon, OX16 1QN
Link opens in new window https://fndhope.org.uk

News and events   
Online resources

Functional Neurological Disorder (FND):  a patient's guide
Link opens in new window https://tinyurl.com/y8xrlyzg

Functional Neurological Disorders [includes'What are functional seizures?'], NHS Sheffield Teaching Hospitals website)
Link opens in new window https://tinyurl.com/y8vck5ey

f.n.d. magazine FND Magazine: online quarterly magazine of FND Hope
Link opens in new window https://tinyurl.com/y9pq4ecy

Functional Neurological Disorder (Patient UK website)
Link opens in new window https://tinyurl.com/y4qdfpwu

 

Functional Neurological Disorder (U.S. National Organization for Rare Disorders)
Link opens in new window https://rarediseases.org/rare-diseases/fnd

Stepped care for functional neurological symptoms: A new approach to improving outcomes for a common neurological problem in Scotland (Health Improvement Scotland website)
Link opens in new window https://tinyurl.com/ybw63rms

Our resources The library at The Brain Charity has a range of resources on Functional Neurological Disorder and on a wide range of disability-related issues.